THE LITERARY INDEX

LITERARY CRITICISM AND ANALYSIS OF NOVELS AND POETRY

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Thomas Hardy Literary Criticism

Tess of the d'Urbervilles

An essay by Deborah Hooker, an Associate Professor at NC State University, which focuses on the racing figures depicted on the protagonists' conjugal bed in order to examine how Hardy employs the motif of race to portray Tess's tragedy.
An essay by Shirley A. Martin of the University of Chicago which utilizes psychoanalysis to investigate how the subject of heredity is psychologically motivated in Hardy's novel.
An academic article by Ralph Harrington discussing the roles of paganism, fate and redemption in Hardy's novel, as well as the author's use of the prehistoric monument Stonehenge as a backdrop to the narrative's themes.
In this essay Andrew Radford explores how Hardy deftly interweaves the Greek myth of the goddesses Persephone and Demeter into the narrative of his novel.
An essay by Scott Rode, an Assistant Professor at Texas A & M University, exploring this novel's depiction of sexuality identity and its relationship to nineteenth-century innovations in technology.
An essay by Ian Mackean discussing the issue of morality in Tess of the d'Urbervilles, featuring analysis of a number of excerpts.

Jude the Obscure

An essay by Holly Davis of the University of Otago examining Hardy's conception of Romanticism, especially in regards to Darwinism and industrialization. The analysis also highlights Shelley's influence on this novel.

Far from the Madding Crowd

The introduction by Rosemarie Morgan to the Penguin World Classics 2000 edition of this novel.

The Woodlanders

A chapter from a thesis by Holly Davis of the University of Otago, exploring Hardy's relationship with Romanticism, his disillusion with the modern world, and how this influenced the narrative of this novel.

The Mayor of Casterbridge

An essay by Marlena Tassone of Lakehead University which considers this novel as an Aristotelian tragedy. Hosted at the Victorian Web.