THE LITERARY INDEX

LITERARY CRITICISM AND ANALYSIS OF NOVELS AND POETRY

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Salman Rushdie Literary Criticism

The Satanic Verses

An essay by Brian Finney, a professor at California State University, providing an in-depth analysis of this novel, as well as assessing it in context, with reference to postmodern and post-colonial aspects, and critical reception in both the east and west.
An essay by Gregory J. Rubinson of the University of California exploring Rushdie's employment of The Koran as a literary intertext in The Satanic Verses.
An essay by Conrad William arguing that Rushdie's controversial novel questions the purity of divine revelation and the integrity of language, as well as exploring ironic tensions between secular and theological domains of discourse.
An essay by Shirley Galloway looking at many different aspects of this novel, including theoretical and historic context, literary influences, the contruction of identity, and an appraisal of how the its form and content play "with the notion of binary opposition".
In this paper Nick Bentley of Staffordshire University assesses the representation of urban environments in both The Satanic Verses and Iain Sinclair's Downriver.

Midnight's Children

An essay by Anita Singh and Rahul Chaturvedi examining historical and genealogical representation in Rushdie's novel; with reference to the work of Michel Foucault.
An essay by Victoria Tatko analyzing the role of myth and the death of the Raj in Rushdie's Booker prize-winning novel and The Jewel in the Crown by Paul Scott.

Fury

An essay by Brian Finney, a professor at California State University, which presents an overview of the critical reception of this novel, as well as an in-depth analysis emphasizing its relationship to Baudrillard's concept of simulacra.
A paper by Justyna Deszcz looking at the utopian concept and the character of professor Malik Solanka in Rushdie's novel, as well as considering the contemporary status of the fairy-tale Utopia.
An essay by Pavlina Radia of the University of Toronto exploring the representation of Otherness and Transnational Memory in this novel and What we all Long For by Dionne Brand.

The Moor's Last Sigh

A paper by John Clement Ball of University of New Brunswick which draws on Bakhtinian theories of satire and the grotesque in an investigation of Rushdie's representation of Indian nationalist politics.
An essay by Robert Marzec looking at the nature of reading and subjectivity in the context of Rushdie's novel and the pervasive influence of the information age.

The Ground Beneath Her Feet

An essay by Rachel Falconer of the University of Sheffield exploring this text from the concepts of both 'metamorphosis' and 'katabasis', perspectives deriving from Virgil and Dante, and their relationship to the depiction of imperialism and colonialism in Rushdie's text.
A scholarly article by Mariam Pirbhai of the Université de Montréal which adopts Fredric Jameson's definition of globalization in an investigation of Rushdie's own exploration of globalizing processes in this novel.
Essay by Mark Shackleton discussing how food - seen here as a marker of national identity - features in this novel as well as works by Timothy Mo and Zadie Smith.
An extensive review of the novel by James Wood for The New Republic.

Shame

An essay by Jenny Sharpe of the University of California using Rushdie's realignment of izzat and sharam to discuss issues of gender, race and class in regards to Indo-Pakistani women, as well as considering the role of the fantastic in the novel.
Essay looking at the importance of memory in Shame and Martin Amis' Time's Arrow.

Haroun and the Sea of Stories

A paper by Eva König of the University of Zurich that challenges previous critical readings which have asserted that this novel is an allegory of Rushdie's own sufferings under the fatwa.