THE LITERARY INDEX

LITERARY CRITICISM AND ANALYSIS OF NOVELS AND POETRY

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09 / 28 / 14   UPDATE

Jane Austen

Mansfield Park

An essay by Rashmi Verma exploring the themes of subjugation and oppression in Mansfield Park, focusing particularly on the character of Sir Thomas Bertram and his role in the slave trade.

Paul Auster

The Brooklyn Follies

A paper by Catherine Pesso-Miquel, a professor at the University of Lyon, examining narrative voice in Auster's novel.

Charlotte Brontë

Jane Eyre

An essay by Marion Lopez-Burette, an English professor, looking at the topic of rebellion in Brontë's novel and Samuel Richardson's Pamela.

Emily Brontë

Wuthering Heights

In this paper, Susan E. James explores similarities and differences between Emily Brontë's novel and Frances Hodgson Burnett's The Secret Garden.

Frances Hodgson Burnett

The Secret Garden

A paper by Susan E. James exploring similarities and differences between this novel and Emily Brontë's Wuthering Heights.

George Gordon Byron

The Siege of Corinth

An essay by David Roessel examining Byron's narrative poem and the historical events which may have influenced it, particularly concerning Lord Elgin's removal of the Parthenon marbles; with analysis of extracts from the poem.

Angela Carter

The Bloody Chamber

An article by Helen Simpson investigating how Carter takes the latent content of traditional fairy tales, and reworks it in her stories to shocking effect.

Kate Chopin

Beyond the Bayou

An essay by Manuel Jobert exploring paralinguistic vocal features in Chopin's story.

Wilkie Collins

The Woman in White

An essay by S. Brooke Cameron, an Assistant Professor of English at Queen’s University, Ontario, exploring the influence of 18th century amatory fiction, such as the novels of Eliza Haywood, on Collins's gender depictions, particularly Marian Halcombe, the heroine of his novel.
In this essay, Philipp Erchinger of the University of Exeter, examines Collins's narrative technique of employing several first person narrators.

Charles Dickens

Bleak House

A paper by Jade Werner of Northwestern University, looking at the similarities between the characters of Mrs. Jellyby and Harold Skimpole, particularly from a perspective of competing cosmopolitanisms.

Hard Times

An essay by Casey A. Cothran of Winthrop University, exploring the ways in which Dickens's novel invites the reader to think critically, with reference to Martha C. Nussbaum and others.

David Copperfield

A paper by Adam McCune of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, which investigates how the themes of idleness and parasitism are juxtaposed with labour and hard work in the novel, with especial attention to the characters of Jack Maldon, Tommy and Sophy Traddles, and Caroline Crewler.

Dombey and Son

An essay by Kebir Sandy, looking at the correspondence between Dickens's novel and Hablot Browne's accompanying illustrations, with reference to the work of Michael Steig, Q.D. Leavis, and others.

Great Expectations

An essay by Meyrav Koren-Kuik of Tel Aviv University which explores how Dickens in Great Expectations and Le Fanu in Uncle Silas bring Gothic conventions into the domestic sphere in their novels.

William Golding

Lord of the Flies

An essay by Chandra N. exploring how the themes of innocence and experience are handled in this novel and Paul Theroux's The Mosquito Coast.

Thomas Hardy

Tess of the d'Urbervilles

An academic article by Ralph Harrington discussing the roles of paganism, fate and redemption in Hardy's novel, as well as the author's use of the prehistoric monument Stonehenge as a backdrop to the narrative's themes.
In this essay Andrew Radford explores how Hardy deftly interweaves the Greek myth of the goddesses Persephone and Demeter into the narrative of his novel.

Sheridan Le Fanu

Uncle Silas

An essay by Meyrav Koren-Kuik of Tel Aviv University which explores how Le Fanu in Uncle Silas and Dickens in Great Expectations bring Gothic conventions into the domestic sphere in their novels.

Doris Lessing

The Fifth Child

An essay by Anne-Laure Brevet presenting an in depth analysis of Ben, the central character of Lessing's novel.

Cormac McCarthy

The Road

An essay by R.A. Goodrich of Deakin University which applies the theories of Gilles Deleuze and Maurice Merleau-Ponty in an analysis of the correlative hypothesis, and the relationship between fictional narrative and reader experience.

Bharati Mukherjee

Desirable Daughters

A paper by Abha Shukla Kaushik exploring Mukherjee's treatment of immigration and multiculturalism in regards to the Indian diaspora in North America.

Wife

In this essay, Archana Trivedi analyzes Mukherjee's depiction of neurosis, particularly in relation to cultural conflict, in Dimple, this novel's immigrant protagonist.

V. S. Naipaul

A House For Mr. Biswas

An essay by Sumitra Kukreti analysing Naipaul's handling of his protagonist, the isolated Mohun Biswas, and his attempts to overcome his alienation.

Jean Rhys

Wide Sargasso Sea

A paper by Sylvie Maurel, examining how the uncanny motifs of Caribbean Gothic in Rhys's novel engage with her treatment of colonial history, as well as the narrative's intertextual relationship with Jane Eyre; with reference to the work of David Punter, Gayatri Spivak, and others.

Samuel Richardson

Pamela

An essay by Marion Lopez-Burette, an English professor, looking at the subject of rebellion in Richardson's novel and Jane Eyre.

Arundhati Roy

The God of Small Things

An essay by Lata Mishra exploring Roy's construction of male identity, as well as the legacy of colonialism in India and the impact of modernity and globalisation.

Salman Rushdie

Midnight's Children

An essay by Anita Singh and Rahul Chaturvedi examining historical and genealogical representation in Rushdie's novel; with reference to the work of Michel Foucault.

Paul Theroux

The Mosquito Coast

An essay by Chandra N. exploring how the themes of innocence and experience are handled in this novel and William Golding's Lord of the Flies.