THE LITERARY INDEX

LITERARY CRITICISM AND ANALYSIS OF NOVELS AND POETRY

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Mary Shelley Literary Criticism

Frankenstein

An essay by Monique R. Morgan of McGill University exploring the role of inductive reasoning in the novel, with reference to Hume and Bacon, as well as an appraisal of Shelley's narrative techniques and an assessment of the novel's relation to the gothic.
An essay by Anne Williams of the University of Georgia claiming that this novel is a hybrid of male and female Gothic conventions. It explores Shelley's representations of masculinity and femininity, as well as her complex frame narrative.
An essay by Laurie Garrison of the University of Lincoln examining the relationship between Frankenstein and Arctic exploration, and also the narrative's stance as a critique of imperialist endeavour.
An academic article by Aija Ozolins which asserts that "Frankenstein is a markedly dualistic work". It examines the narrative's many contrasts and conflicts.
A paper by Sherry Ginn of Wingate University exploring themes of procreation and death by applying Erik Erikson's theory of psychosocial development to Shelley's life in an in-depth analysis of the famous story.
An essay by Jonathan Glance, a professor at Mercer University, which applies a cultural historicist approach to the role of dreams in Frankenstein.
An essay by Lee E. Heller looking at Frankenstein from a cultural context in relation to literacy and education, as well as the genre of the Gothic novel.
A linguistic analysis by Lizzie Knowles of Frankenstein and 'The Bloody Chamber' by Angela Carter, with reference to the work of Diane Elam and Michael Halliday.
An essay by Jane Maree Maher of Monash University which examines cultural constructions of pregnancy through Shelley's famous text.
An essay by David Collings presenting a Lacanian reading of the novel.

The Last Man

An essay by Richard S. Albright which assesses a number of readings before proposing that "the novel is permeated by narrative rhythms that work to complicate constantly the reader's perception of time". Includes analysis of several excerpts.
An academic article by Betty T. Bennett arguing that it is the Romanticism of The Last Man "that engenders significance both to the title of the work".
An essay by Daniel Schierenbeck of the University of Central Missouri exploring the relationships between religion, civilization, and imperialism in regards to this novel.
An academic article by Morton D. Paley discussing many aspects of The Last Man, including the context of its development and reactions of contemporary reviewers.

The Fortunes of Perkin Warbeck

An essay by Lidia Garbin assessing the influence of Sir Walter Scott on this novel.

Valperga

A paper by Daniel E. White presenting a reading of this novel asserting that it is primarily concerned with "Italy and the feminine". With analysis of several extracts.