THE LITERARY INDEX

LITERARY CRITICISM AND ANALYSIS OF NOVELS AND POETRY

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Jane Eyre
By Charlotte Brontë

An academic article by Tracy Lemaster discussing the relationship between Jane's feminist attributes and her maternal instincts, with analysis of several excerpts.
A paper by Nina Pelikan Straus, a Professor of Literature at Purchase College, suggesting how neurobiological-psychoanalytic approaches to metaphor - particularly those of 'fire' and 'gaze' - elicit intense emotional reactions in the reader.
An essay by Kirstin Hanley, an Assistant Professor at SUNY Fredonia, looking at the role of female relationships in Jane's education, with particular reference to the works of Mary Wollstonecraft and analysis of several excerpts.
A chapter from Caught in the Act by Joseph Litvak, a book exploring the theatricality in the nineteenth-century English novel. This chapter looks at Brontë's novel.
An introduction by Joyce Carol Oates originally published as a preface to a 1988 edition of Brontë's novel.
An essay by Emily Allen and Dino Franco Felluga of Purdue University. It primarily looks at the relationship between Victorian Gothic and Opera, using a musical adaptation of Jane Eyre as a focal point.
A paper by Cristina Ceron investigating the role of the Byronic hero in Jane Eyre and Wuthering Heights. Ceron looks at the relationship between Jane and Rochester, and how Brontë effectively incorporates Gothic elements into an ostensibly realist narrative.
An essay by Marion Lopez-Burette, an English professor, looking at the topic of rebellion in Brontë's novel and Samuel Richardson's Pamela.
An essay by Ivonne Defant of the University of Trento exploring the theme of the imprisoned and socially-marginalized woman in Brontë's famous novel, and the German writer Eugenie Marlitt's Die zweite Frau.
A scholarly article by Vicky Simpson of the University of New Brunswick investigating the role of storytelling and autobiography in the novel, arguing that Jane implicitly "challenges social institutions by gaining the authoritative position of storyteller".
A comparative analysis of Jane Eyre and Daphne Du Maurier's Rebecca by Marta Miquel-Baldellou of the University of Lleida, outlining the interpretative evolution of the main characters in Brontë's novel.
An essay by Patricia Gott, an Assistant Professor at the University of Wisconsin, discussing female captivity and empowerment in relation to Jane Eyre, as well as Jean Rhys's Wide Sargasso Sea and Daphne Du Maurier's Rebecca.
An essay by Julia Miele Rodas of City University of New York exploring the notion that the protagonist of Brontë's novel is on the autistic spectrum.
In this essay Angie Pazhavila of Seattle University explores the notion of a 'female gothic subtext' in Jane Eyre and Charlotte Perkins Gilman's 'The Yellow Wallpaper'.