THE LITERARY INDEX

LITERARY CRITICISM AND ANALYSIS OF NOVELS AND POETRY

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A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Shirley Jackson

The Lottery

An essay by Peter Kosenko discussing the structure of the narrative and the relationships of characters and themes, primarily arguing that the story is a comment on capitalist ideology.

Naomi Jacob

Barren Metal

A paper by Claire M. Tylee assessing various critical responses to this novel. It argues that a consideration of "the significant openness" of Jacob's test is essential to an understanding of 1930s British culture.

Harriet Jacobs

Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl

An essay by Tatum Petrich of Temple University exploring the white males in the narrative and showing how Jacob's appeals to her reader's sympathies.
An essay by Katja Kanzler of the University of Leipzig looking at architectural figurations of race and gender in this novel and Harriet Wilson's Our Nig.

Henry James

The Golden Bowl

An academic paper by Thomas F. Bertonneau analyzing several characters and scenes from James' last complete novel.

The Portrait of a Lady

A chapter from Marilyn R. Chandler's Dwelling in the Text: Houses in American Fiction arguing that James adopts an architectural approach in the creation of narrative.

The Tragic Muse

A chapter from Joseph Litvak's Caught in the Act: Theatricality in the Nineteenth-Century English Novel exploring figuration and counterplot.

The Aspern Papers

A paper by Aristie Trendel, an assistant professor of English at Montpellier I University, exploring themes and relationships and their connections with art and literary traditions in James's novella.
An essay by Thomas F. Bertonneau of Central Michigan College, discussing how James explores issues relating to religion, social revolution and art, focusing in particular on the anonymous narrators of this novel and James's The Sacred Fount, as well as Hyacinth Robinson from the same author's The Princess Casamassima.

The Bostonians

An essay by Thomas F. Bertonneau of Central Michigan College which utilizes theories of René Girard and Eric L. Gans to argue that there is "a conscious and conclusive working-out of James' novelistic meditation on the linkage between desire, resentment, and sacrifice" in The Bostonians.

The Turn of the Screw

An academic article by Martin Scofield, a Senior Lecturer at the University of Kent, exploring the narrative effects of "implied stories" in James's famous novella.
An essay by Edward Lobb investigating James's reasoning for his novella's complex frame narrative, as well as looking at thematic parallels with King Lear.
An essay by Andrew J. Scheiber of the University of St. Thomas investigating desire and Emile Durkheim's concept of "anomie", especially in relation to James's governess.
In this essay Sumia S. Abdul Hafidh considers whether James's novella is a ghost story or a study in sexual repression.

The Princess Casamassima

In this essay, Anne-Claire Le Reste examines James's use and motivations for his many intertextual references in this novel to established masters of realism and naturalism, such as Honoré de Balzac, Charles Dickens and Émile Zola.
In this essay Anne-Claire Le Reste applies a Gothic reading to The Princess Casamassima, identifying various conventions from that genre and how they relate to the realism of James's text.
An essay by Thomas F. Bertonneau of Central Michigan College, discussing how James explores issues relating to religion, social revolution and art, focusing in particular on Hyacinth Robinson from this novel, and the anonymous narrators of James's The Sacred Fount and The Aspern Papers.

The Jolly Corner

An academic article by Claude Forray about the transatlantic duality, or 'other place', of this short story's protagonist and his relationship with his alter-ego.

The Sacred Fount

An essay by Thomas F. Bertonneau of Central Michigan College, discussing how James explores issues relating to religion, social revolution and art, focusing in particular on the anonymous narrators of this novel and James's The Aspern Papers, as well as Hyacinth Robinson from the same author's The Princess Casamassima.

M.R. James

The Ghost Stories

A paper by Maria Purves which argues that James's intellectual outlook and choice of narrative style were determined by an autistic spectrum condition.
In this essay Ralph Harrington considers how James utilizes the ambiguity of technology, namely the railway system, as a tool for the depiction of his supernatural agents.

Sarah Orne Jewett

The Country of the Pointed Firs

A paper by Melissa Richardson which considers various readings of this novel, both as a feminist text and a 'transcendental text'.

The Tory Lover

A thesis by Heather Petsche discussing many aspects of the novel. It argues that the plot is structured around the character's development and that the work itself deserves serious study.

James Joyce

Ulysses

A chapter from Joyce in America: Cultural Politics and the Trials of Ulysses by Jeffrey Segall examining Joyce's political and aesthetic standpoints in comparison to contemporaneous writers.
An academic article by Richard Kearney, a professor at Boston College, on the depiction and function of epiphanies in this novel and Proust's Remembrance of Things Past.

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

A paper by Louis Armand, a senior lecturer at Charles University discussing language in the novel through close readings of key scenes.

Finnegans Wake

A paper by Sagit Blumrosen-Sela examining some of the literary parallels, both in terms of content and form, between this novel and The Same Sea by Amos Oz.
An essay by Patrick A. McCarthy exploring the nature of narrative in this novel and Joyce's various methods of narration.
An article by Louis Armand, a senior lecturer at Charles University considering the relationship between structure, hypertext and genetics in Finnegans Wake.