THE LITERARY INDEX

LITERARY CRITICISM AND ANALYSIS OF NOVELS AND POETRY

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George Eliot Literary Criticism

Middlemarch

An academic article by Jonathan Farina of Seton Hall University asserting that Mr Brooke's comic idioms can be viewed as a paradigm for the style in Middlemarch.
An essay by Clifford J. Marks, an Associate Professor at the University of Wyoming discussing Eliot's representation of ethics in Middlemarch, with reference to Spinoza and the work of the French philosopher Emmanuel Levinas.
An academic article by Ignês Sodré exploring thematic links between the characters of Dorothea Brooke from Middlemarch and Maggie Tulliver from The Mill on the Floss.
An essay by Matthew Beaumont, University College London, challenging criticism of Middlemarch and Adam Bede where the works are considered to be traditional realist, the essay looks at two particular scenes from the novels.
An essay by Shu-chuan Chou which surveys various critical assessments of Dorothea's marriage to Will Ladislaw, referencing Julia Kristeva's theory of the dynamic interaction between semiotic and symbolic forces.
A chapter from Nerves and Narratives: A Cultural History of Hysteria in 19th-Century British Prose by Peter Melville Logan, claiming that Middlemarch "represents medicine's uncertain relationship with bodies as objects of knowledge".
In this essay Bernard J. Paris, emeritus professor at the University of Florida, presents a reading of Dorothea Brooke's character, with reference to the theories of the German psychoanalyst Karen Horney.
In this essay James Luberda of the University of Connecticut uses the social psychology concept of 'positioning theory' in a reading of Middlemarch, with analysis of several excerpts from the text.
A substantial essay from The Victorian Web about the use of science in the novel.

The Mill on the Floss

An essay by Anna Marutollo of McGill University on the de-construction of the domestic and the re-construction of Empire in this novel and Charlotte Brontë's Villette.
An academic article by Ignês Sodré exploring thematic links between the characters of Maggie Tulliver from The Mill on the Floss and Dorothea Brooke from Middlemarch.

Adam Bede

An essay by Matthew Beaumont, University College London, challenging criticism of Adam Bede and Middlemarch where the works are considered to be traditional realist, the essay looks at two particular scenes from the novels.
An essay by Julianne White exploring the subjects of community, stereotype and insanity in this novel and Dickens's Great Expectatons.

Romola

An essay by Peggy Fitzhugh Johnstone examining the relationships between fathers and daughters in this novel with reference to the theories of psychoanalysts Otto F. Kernberg and John Bowlby, and also a discussion of Eliot's own upbringing.
A scholarly article by Julia Straub of the University of Berne arguing that Romola is a deconstructive novel and analzying various aspects of the text.

Silas Marner

An essay by Laura Emery, a lecturer at San Diego State University, and Margaret Keenan, on the roles of trauma and mastery in this novel and their psychological relationship to its eponymous protagonist.
An article by Shirley Galloway examining how the allegorical nature of this novel reveals the relationships between plot, character and symbolism.

Felix Holt, the Radical

An essay by Tim Watson, a Professor at the University of Miami, analyzing this novel and Eliot's Daniel Deronda in the context of scientific enquiries into race and descent, with reference to the Morant Bay uprising in Jamaica.

The Lifted Veil

An essay by Ryan Barnett of the University of Central England which explores gender and apocalypse in this novella and The Two Destinies by Wilkie Collins.
An essay by Joy Johnson of the University of Georgia examining this novella's narrator as well as the role of science and technology in Eliot's narrative.

Daniel Deronda

A chapter from Caught in the Act: Theatricality in the Nineteenth-Century English Novel by Joseph Litvak, who discusses several aspects of the novel but pays attention to how Eliot set her work apart from sensationalist fiction.
A paper by Marina Ludwigs looking at group destiny and Zionism in Daniel Deronda from the perspectives of phenomenology and generative anthropology.
An academic article by Carl T. Rotenberg which speculates on the influence of George Eliot on Sigmund Freud through an analysis of the relationship between Gwendolen Harleth and Daniel Deronda.
An essay by Françoise Dupeyron-Lafay looking at how Eliot uses suggestion and allusion to explore such 19th century taboos as physical relations and the body.
In this essay Denise Tischler Millstein of Louisiana State University illustrates how Eliot drew on the work of Lord Byron for subject matter and themes in Danial Deronda.
An essay by Joseph Adamson, a Professor at McMaster University, which draws on psychologist Silvan Tomkins's concept of the "depressive posture" for an extensive analysis of Eliot's last novel.
An essay by Monika Müller, University of Cologne, examining issues of race, gender and identity - both individual and social - in this novel, and also Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin and Dred.
In this essay, Rosanna Wood looks at the construction of character in Eliot's novel by analyzing several principal characters and critical reactions to them.
An essay by Tim Watson, a Professor at the University of Miami, analyzing this novel and Eliot's Felix Holt, the Radical in the context of scientific enquiries into race and descent, with reference to the Morant Bay uprising in Jamaica.