THE LITERARY INDEX

LITERARY CRITICISM AND ANALYSIS OF NOVELS AND POETRY

Bookmark and Share
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Fyodor Dostoevsky Literary Criticism

Crime and Punishment

A section by Richard Gill of Pace University, from Dostoevsky Studies, exploring - with close readings - the notion that the bridges of St. Petersburg function as a motif reflecting the course of the protagonist's internal drama.
A section by Steven Cassedy of California University, from Dostoevsky Studies, looking at the formally controversial epilogue in Crime and Punishment.

The Brothers Karamazov

An essay by Joyce Carol Oates analysing various aspects of the novel, such as pyschology, ideas and structure. With discussion of several excerpts.
An essay by Matthew M. Wylie of Stephen F. Austin State University examining Dostoevsky's sociological and psychological representations of crime. Wylie employs Carlo Ginzburg's ideas on space and time, and their relationship with guilt and pity.
In this essay Nicholas Rourke Miller, of University of North Carolina, asserts that "the struggle between reason and faith, and its bearing on the moral psychology of the four brothers are at the heart of Dostoevsky's greatest novel".

The Possessed

An essay by Joyce Carol Oates on Dostoevsky's "most satisfactorily 'tragic' work" examines, with a selection of excerpts, several characters and scenes in the novel as well as evalauting certain criticisms of form and structure.

The Idiot

An academic article by Thomas Epstein exploring the role of memory through an examination of the characters General Ivolgin and Prince Myshkin.

The House of the Dead

An academic essay by Dr Robert Berry of the University of Otago providing a detailed examination of parallel ideology and experience in this Dostoevky novel and Conrad's Heart of Darkness.

Notes from Underground

An essay by David A. Goldfarb investigating the presence of Kant's aesthetics in this novel. With the aid of several close readings Goldfarb probes the nature of the protagonist's 'ironic individualism'.