THE LITERARY INDEX

LITERARY CRITICISM AND ANALYSIS OF NOVELS AND POETRY

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A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Chinua Achebe

Things Fall Apart

An essay by Linda Strong-Leek, an Assistant Professor at Florida International University, analysing Achebe's novel in relation to feminist criticism with reference to Jonathan Culler's On Deconstruction: Theory and Criticism after Structuralism.
A review by Howard W. French, looking in particular at the anti-colonial subtext of Things Fall Apart and the emergence of a genuine African voice.

No Longer At Ease

A paper by Ian H. Munro of William Jewell College examining some of the implications of applying intertextual theory to postcolonial literature, with reference to this novel and Achebe's non-fiction work Home and Exile.
A paper by Harry Olufunwa which explores a perceived correlation between ethnicity and geographical space in this novel and Ralph Ellison's Juneteenth.

A Man of the People

A paper by Beth Kramer of New York University analysing depictions of masculinity and homosocial desire in this novel and Graham Greene's The Quiet American.

Girls at War and Other Stories

An essay by Ode Ogede of North Carolina Central University exploring Achebe's narrative experimentation from within the context of a debt to oral tradition.

Peter Ackroyd

Chatterton

An essay by Brian Finney, a professor at California State University, examining the post-modernist implications of Ackroyd's novel. It looks at this author's work in general before progressing to a study of Chatterton, highlighting in particular the impartiality of the writer's narrative stance.
An essay by Stefanie Albers of the University of Duisburg-Essen exploring the phenomenon of the haunting, and how it manifests in Ackroyd's multi-layered narrative.

Robert Aickman

The Late Breakfasters

An essay by Gary William Crawford discussing religion, the supernatural, gender, and the nature of reality, in this novel and Sheridan Le Fanu's Uncle Silas.

Ama Ata Aidoo

Changes

An essay by Ibrahima Ndiaye exploring how Aidoo uses space and time, as well as illustrating the semiotic analysis of spatial and temporal patterning in her novel.

Louisa May Alcott

Little Women

An essay by Sarah Klein, M.A. It looks at the enduring appeal of Alcott's novel, focusing in part on its relationship with the traditional conduct book.

Brian Aldiss

Starship

A long article by Fredric Jameson, looking closely at the concept of the 'artificial' in Starship, with some emphasis as to how the plotline of this novel characterizes it as new wave Science Fiction.

José de Alencar

Lucíola

An essay by André Cardoso of New York University on the nineteenth-century literary conception of Brazil in this novel and Joaquim Manuel de Macedo's A Moreninha.

Kingsley Amis

Lucky Jim

An essay by Stephen Colbourn focusing mainly on the relationship between Amis and the emergence of the 'university novel'.
An in-depth review of the novel by Christopher Hitchens for The Atlantic Monthly.

Martin Amis

Money

In this essay, Brian Finney explores the relationship between the protagonist and narrator in Money, and the implications of the plot structure of Time's Arrow.
An essay by Jon Begley, a tutor at the University of Leicester, which draws on Mikhail Bakhtin's concept of dialogism, for a reading which emphasizes the dialogic and transatlantic structure of Money.
A paper by Florian Niedlich analyzing how this novel's unusual narrative method responds, both in form and content, to the Thatcher years.
An essay by Jamie McCulloch of Fairleigh Dickinson University looking at the literary devices Amis employs in Money and The Information to convey comedy and tradegy in his picaresque narratives and roguish protagonists; McCulloch also discusses works by Richard Russo, Michael Chabon, Jonathan Safran Foer, and Steve Tesich.

London Fields

An essay by Brian Finney, a professor at California State University, examining the relationship between the narrator and characters of Other People and London fields.
An essay by Zia Gluhbegovic of Belgrade University which explores some of the narrative strategies Amis employs in his rendering of London in this novel.

Night Train

A paper by María Jesús Martínez-Alfaro, a Senior Lecturer at The University of Zaragoza, evaluating Amis's novel as an example of metaphysical detective fiction.

Time's Arrow

An essay by Brian Finney, a professor at California State University, examining the implications of modernity and how they impact on the narrative of Amis's novel.
In this essay, Brian Finney explores the relationship between the protagonist and narrator in Money, and the implications of the plot structure of Time's Arrow.
Essay looking at the importance of memory in Time's Arrow and Salman Rushdie's Shame.

Other People

An essay by Brian Finney, a professor at California State University, examining the relationship between the narrator and characters of Other People and London fields.

The Information

An essay by Jamie McCulloch of Fairleigh Dickinson University looking at the literary devices Amis employs in The Information and Money to convey comedy and tradegy in his picaresque narratives and roguish protagonists; McCulloch also discusses works by Richard Russo, Michael Chabon, Jonathan Safran Foer, and Steve Tesich.

Maya Angelou

I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings

A thesis by Clifford J. Kurkowski in which he classifies this book as an African-American Female Bildungsroman.

Matthew Arnold

Empedocles on Etna

An essay by Katherine E. Agar providing an object-relations analysis drawing on the work and theories of Melanie Klein and Donald Winnicott. It claims that a literary suicide is organized in Arnold's poem.

John Ashbery

Self-Portrait in a Convex Mirror

An essay in which Kim Howey of University College London discusses this poem and Elizabeth Bishop's 'The Gentleman of Shallott'.

Isaac Asimov

The Gods Themselves

An article by Ina Rae Hark focusing specifically on the three-part structure of Asimov's novel and the nature of narrative unity.

Margaret Atwood

The Handmaid's Tale

In this essay Marta Caminero-Santangelo argues that Atwood's novel represents a postmodern feminist sensibility in its conceptualizing of resistance to a dominant order. It also highlights differences between modernism and postmodernism.
A paper by Jamie Dopp in which the prevailing critical consensus of The Handmaid's Tale, in that it is a novel working against women's oppression, is challenged by the assertion that it reproduces the tendencies of a patriarchy.

The Robber Bride

An academic article by Ellen McCarthy which considers the role of multiple identities in Atwood's novel and the challenge they present to the notion of national identity.

Cat's Eye

An essay by Marta Dvorak which explores this novel as a Künstlerroman - a narrative that documents its protagonist's artistic development. Dvorak examines the text's engagement with the visual arts and looks at the poetic devices Atwood employs.

Oryx and Crake

A paper by Grayson Cooke of Central Queensland University looking at the role of biotechnology and the relationship between language and human life in Atwood's post-apocalyptic novel. Also assesses the criticial reception of Oryx and Crake.

Alias Grace

An essay by Jennifer Murray examining Atwood's depiction of a historic double murder and the implications this novel's multiplicity of narrative perspectives has on historiographic de-construction and re-construction.

Surfacing

An essay by Jerome H. Rosenberg featuring some observations on the end of Atwood's novel.
An essay by Carole Gerson exploring how the conflict between form and experience is depicted in this novel.
In this article Jill Dawson discusses Surfacing from the perspective of a woman's spiritual journey.

Bluebeard's Egg

An essay by Carol Merli which explores the relationship between body and text through Atwood's use of post-modern strategies.

Jane Austen

Pride and Prejudice

An article by H.L. Jackson of the University of Toronto. It focuses on Mr Bennet, enquiring as to the nature of his library before adopting a highly specific discussion about libraries in the early 19th century.
An academic article by George R. Clay challenging the views E.M. Forster expresses in his Aspects of the Novel regarding the role of "flat characterization". Clay looks at the roles of several 'flat characters' in this novel, as well as Dickens's David Copperfield and Tolstoy's War and Peace.

Emma

An academic article by Susan J. Wolfson of Princeton University. It looks specifically at the Boxhill episode in this novel.
Close analysis by Adam Potkay of the Boxhill episode.
Close analysis by William Walling of the Boxhill episode.

Sense and Sensibility

An essay by Susannah Carson of the L'Université de Versailles investigating the paradox of silence in relation to the female characters and their perspectives in this novel, Mansfield Park, and Persuasion.
An essay by Jen Camden of the University of Indianapolis looking at the roles of primary and secondary heroines in this novel, James Fenimore Cooper's The Pioneers, and Ann Radcliffe's A Sicilian Romance. Camden focuses in particular on how these women represent competing ideals of national identity and femininity.

Northanger Abbey

An essay looking at the nature of the narrator, by Henry N. Rogers III, professor of English at the University of Central Arkansas.
An essay by Nicola Cummins of the University of Otago, looking at the role of the "sympathetic imagination" in the novel. It asserts that how the heroine regulates this quality is at the heart of Northanger Abbey and all Austen's work.
A scholarly article by Anthony Mandal of Cardiff University called 'Revising the Radcliffean Model'. It explores how the work of Ann Radcliffe impacted on Northanger Abbey and Clermont - a Gothic novel by Regina Maria Roche.

Persuasion

An essay by Kelly Marsh, an Associate Professor at Mississippi State University, exploring various aspects of narrative theory, and this novel's submerged plot of the protagonist's mother and it's influence over the surface plot of marriage.
An essay by Meaghan Malone examining how Austen employs the female gaze in her novel to create a distinctive masculinity with her male characters.
An essay by Michael Kramp exploring Austen's portrayal of social malleability through an analysis of this novel's principal characters, Anne and Wentworth.
An essay by Susannah Carson of the L'Université de Versailles investigating the paradox of silence in relation to the female characters and their perspectives in this novel, Sense and Sensibility and Mansfield Park.
A paper by Claire Eileen Tarlson of Seattle University arguing that Austen's final novel Persuasion is a powerful revisioning of Pride and Prejudice.
An essay by Ian Mackean in which he looks at Austen's use of authorial voice and point of view in this novel.
A substantial page from the Victorian Web, written by Felix Moses, an Associate Professor at Madras Christian College, discussing the structuralist idea of a Semic code, and how this relates to Austen's novel.

Mansfield Park

A paper by Matthew Taylor of Kinjo Gakuin University exploring Austen's conception of landscapes in this novel, especially the thematic role of the forest and its relationship to the narrative's characters.
A chapter from Caught in the Act by Joseph Litvak, a book exploring the theatricality in the nineteenth-century English novel. This chapter looks at Austen's novel.
An essay by Rashmi Verma exploring the themes of subjugation and oppression in Mansfield Park, focusing particularly on the character of Sir Thomas Bertram and his role in the slave trade.
An essay by Matthew Taylor of Kinjo Gakuin University discussing the theme of scandal in Mansfield Park through critical reactions to Maria Rushworth's affair.
An academic article by Leona Toker exploring various aspects of the novel.
An essay by Susannah Carson of the L'Université de Versailles investigating the paradox of silence in relation to the female characters and their perspectives in this novel, Persuasion, and Sense and Sensibility.
An article from the Victorian Web on Austen's negotiations with slavery in the novel.

Lady Susan

An essay by Susan Anthony exploring this story from Austen's juvenalia.

Paul Auster

The New York Trilogy

A thesis by Chris Pace exploring the books which comprise this trilogy. A central theme is how the reader engages with the text.
An essay by Nicholas Dawson which seeks to distinguish the identity of the author and character in Auster's trilogy as well as examining how they relate to each other.

City of Glass

An essay by Richard Swope exploring the relationship between this novel's protagonist and the city he inhabits, referencing Henri Lefebvre's spatial theories.

Leviathan

An essay by Anna Khimasia of Carleton University examining the intertextuality between Auster's novel and artist Sophie Calle's book Double Game.

Moon Palace

A paper by Pál Hegyi which explores Auster's use of the theoretical concept 'mise-en-abyme', particularly in relation to the 'moon motif' in this novel, and referencing the work of André Gide, Maurice Blanchot, Jacques Derrida, and others.
The role of The Frontier is discussed in this long essay by Christian Seidl.

The Brooklyn Follies

A paper by Catherine Pesso-Miquel, a professor at the University of Lyon, examining narrative voice in Auster's novel.

The Invention of Solitude

An extensive article by Stephen Fredman featuring several close readings.

Timbuktu

An article by James Murphy.

Margaret Avison

Sunblue

An essay by Ernest H. Redekop featuring several close readings of the poems.

Winter Sun

An essay by J.M. Zezulka analysing the poems in this collection.